The
Sandridge Horses



ARTICLES:


- Meet Ralph

2017
- Ottawa and Bromont
- Competition Prep
- Winter Progress

2016
- Teeth and Ulcers
- Clinic & Colic
- Ottawa Horse Trials
- Dressage Clinic & Stevens Creek
- Robinson Horse Trials
- Harmony Horse Trials
- Tandalee Horse Trials
- Ringworm and Dressage
- Jessica Clinic
- Oakhurst XC Trials
- AERSO Dressage
- Health Check


Meet Ralph

I met Ralph at a polo farm when I was using their track to condition my event horse, Remy. He was quite big for a polo 'pony', had a kind eye, and looked very dejected, standing tied up with a muzzle on in his stall. The owner of the farm mentioned that he was for sale, and suggested I take him to try. I laughed it off, as the last thing I needed was another horse...

Two weeks later, after Remy had what appeared to be a sigificant tendon injury, I was back asking about the horse. We made an arrangement that I would take him for a month or so, school him a bit, and see if we could sell him. Long story short, I quickly fell for him, and although I realized he was going to be a looonnng project, I couldn't bear the thought of him going back to his main job as a 'polo-pony-ponier', so I cobbled together the cash to buy him.
Somethings to like, and some...not so much!
His feet were a disaster!
We could have called him,"Pencil-Neck", but Betty came up with 'Ralph Lauren' since he was bred for polo. He's a simple guy, though, so Ralph is all the name he needs.

In the beginning, we had serious problems with steering and he was constantly tripping when he would go off into 'la-la' land and fall on the forehand. He cribs, though less often, and he has some TMJ sensitivity we try to stay on top of with physio. Getting him to eat can be a challenge, although he is much better after having ulcers treated. He likes a haynet where he can watch what's going on around him, otherwise he will only pick at it during the day. He's very laid back at home and it can be difficult to get him to focus, but he seems to respond well to different work every day. He is very honest and brave and doesn't hold mistakes against me. It has been a long and interesting process to get him where he is and he's been the perfect amount of challenge for my stage of riding.


2017

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Ottawa and Bromont
It was a busy and successful start to the season, with a little health-hiccup thrown into the mix to avoid things being too dull. Our first Event was at Wesley Clover Park in Ottawa. It's one of my favourite events as the facilities and courses are so good - but it always seems to rain and the forecast wasn't looking too promising, so I packed multiples of everything to be prepared and the rain held off. Dressage was good; Ralph felt a little dead to the leg, but he managed to win the dressage by a few points. Stadium Jumping felt terrific with a nice forward and positive round, but we had an unlucky rail. On to cross-country....we had shipped up with Peekay in her luxurious transport, so I was ready for Ralph's "where's my best friend NOW??" act, but he was actually pretty good until she departed for cross-country without him! I had a bit of a time staying on before my start, but at least he was awake! I had a pretty good round with only a few time penalties, but a few too many 'flyer' fences where my lyin' eyes saw a longer spot than they should have. Must wait...must wait...must wait! All in all, a good start and we finished 3rd of 14.

On the Tuesday following the event, Ralph came in from the field with blood trickling out of his left nostril. While this went on for hours, after a veterinary consult we weren't too concerned and kept an eye on him. Wednesday morning's stall got us concerned as it looked like Ralph had shared it with a cow - judging from the 'cow plop' manure in it. Then Andy and I both noticed Ralph stretching out to pee and not much happening. He didn't have a temperature, but I called Dr. Hallé and he came out to check him. Again, we were advised to keep an eye on him and wait. After lunch, the vet came back to do a rectal exam, and lo and behold, things started working properly and his bleeding nose stopped! I'm going to keep in mind how effective that, "the vet's coming to do a rectal on you" works - I may use it in future! We did discuss the fact that Ralph has started leaving his breakfast and being more fussy about eating, so we put him on Omeprazole for 10 days, then a reduced dose for a while to see if that won't help his tender tummy.

Skipping through the water in Ottawa

Next up was Little Bromont. If that site doesn't get you inspired, you might be in the wrong sport...It was Ralph's first time there, but he was calm and happy from the beginning. As long as I find the time to take him out for grass and a wander around, he seems quite content. His dressage was decent, putting him in 8th of 24 - and only about 5 penalties away from the leader. I had a little too much time to think between dressage and jumping and my nerves were running amok; I kept asking myself, "WHY am I putting myself through this??" Once I got on and started warming up I was much better, and Ralph put in a super stadium round - one of only a handful of clear rounds. Off to cross-country and, for Ralph, very challenging terrain. While we had time faults, Ralph jumped everything in front of him safely and confidently and was quite happy to gallop as fast as I liked - as long as it wasn't downhill, where he felt trotting to be more his speed! I am so lucky to have this kind and generous horse, and was satisfied to finish 8th in good company. Oh, and WHY do I put myself through this? The satisfaction of seeing the work and training I put into myself and Ralph result in performances like this:)

Looking very confident!


Competition Prep
Our first event of 2017 is just around the corner; we are confident we are well-prepared and ready to go...

A Coggins Test was done in April and Ralph had his vaccinations over the course of two weeks. He had his teeth floated (again!) as he seems to develop some rough edges if they are left longer than about 6 months. Our wonderful farrier, Ray Matthews, has retired, so Martin Campbell came and installed Ralph's summer tires. Memberships have been renewed, the truck and trailer are ready to roll, and the packing list has been updated.

Despite the lousy weather, our training has progressed well, and we had a very good session with Lee Tubman the day before our 2017 competitive debut at the AERSO dressage show at Beaulieu. Ralph was very well-behaved for the most part, and performed a decent Second Level test and had a very good First Level effort.
   
Our second outing was to the Jessica Phoenix Clinic at Beaulieu. Ralph was very full of himself and acted quite the fool in the stable - whinnying and pawing at times, and even escaping under his stall guard one afternoon when he decided he should be out grazing with the others on the lawn! His extra energy was easily channelled in his dressage and jumping sessions though, and it was a pleasure to ride him. His cross-country work the second day was also very good and he felt rideable and confident.
At the event, our goal is to be in the top 25% after dressage and to go clear in the jumping and cross-country. I will not hurry him on cross-country as we haven't done any proper gallops or conditioning work, but I would like to avoid too many time penalties!


Winter Progress
Ralph wanted to make sure his fans got an update - even if we haven't been doing a lot of 'adventuring' over the winter...seems to me he's feeling SO much better after having his ulcers taken care of that he's actually getting a little pushy! We've spent the winter working on improving our flatwork, and although the extra energy Ralph brings to his work is wonderful, it has also made the ever-elusive half-halts even more challenging.
His jumping work has been progressing well, although again, I could do without the bucks-of-glee to celebrate his success! Spring has officially arrived, and we are looking at 6 weeks before the first competition...Yikes! Where did the time go??
Ralph says, "I thought you said it was spring? This doesn't look like spring...".


2016

Teeth and Ulcers
With the show season over, it was time to try to figure out Ralph's lack of interest in eating. In the summer, although I wouldn't mind adding a little 'oomph' to his energy level, he keeps his condition pretty well as we are lucky enough to have good grazing and he LOVES his grass. In the winter it is more difficult, and it was time to try to get to the bottom of things...

We did a fecal count, and he didn't have worms. Had Dr. Heather Ross out to examine his teeth, and although he had a few rough edges (and that after only 6 months since he was last done), it didn't explain everything. After talking with Dr. Hallé, we decided to give him a course of omeprazole. Although his lifestyle (other than being a competition horse) and feeding regimen don't support a theory of ulcers, he does crib, and really, we had nothing to lose!
Within about 4 days Ralph was more interested in his food, and although not a glutton by any stretch - and he still cribs - he was eating like a normal horse. He seemed a bit more energetic as well, but I'm not sure if that was just a little cool-weather friskiness!


Colic and Clinic
Ralph had a busy week - a bit unorthodox in preparing for a clinic, but sometimes you just have to go with the flow...

Dr. Jennifer Jobin came out on Monday to see if some acupuncture would help Ralph's head. It has been gradually getting better and he has been more comfortable, but we still felt it was worth it to try. Tuesday he was off, Wednesday we went for a hack. Ralph was happy and forward until we arrived back at the farm, where as soon as we stopped, he started pawing and went down to his knees as soon as I got off! I hustled him into his stall and got his tack off and down he went! Colic. Dr. Halle arrived within half an hour and Ralph was given a sedative and pain medication and then tubed. We kept an eye on him, but there were no after-effects and he was looking for food.

On Thursday we had a flat session and Ralph felt very good, but I wasn't able to ride Friday and we had Lee Tubman coming for a dressage clinic on the weekend - not the ideal preparation!

Saturdays' effort was not awe-inspiring - surprise!, but it was better Sunday, and we have a laundry list of things to work on over the winter. Particularly with an Event horse who has jumping and fitness work to do each week, it is hard during the competition season to focus as much as necessary on improving the dressage.


Ottawa Horse Trials
Ottawa Horse Trials was our last Event of the season, and it turned out to be successful in a couple of ways. First, we finished 3rd on our dressage score plus only 1.6 time penalties. For those who have followed him this season, you know that in his last 3 Pre-training competitions Ralph had 17, then 7, and now only 1 time fault. Yay wild-man Ralph!

The more important success was how we handled the crazy insecure whinnying when he arrived at the show. Peekay hadn't even arrived and he was obsessively calling. Kathy and I went for a hack around and then did some flatwork - purposely schooling them in separate areas. At first - incessant neighing and the old "I-will-twist my-head-and-neck-so-I can-always-see-her" trick, but I was determined to stay calm and see how I could work through it. It turned out that patting him and praising EACH STEP that was calm and focused seemed to do the trick. At first, it was one 'good boy' every 20 steps, then 10, and finally we had quite a good session. This did work the next day, as well, and I had very little issue with focus for the rest of the event. Who knew?

Ralph had a session with his osteopath a few days later and we discovered his poll area was very sensitive. Thinking it may be as a result of his cribbing on a different part of the stall - he has cleverly learned how to removed a couple of the vertical bars between stalls, so instead of chewing on his feed tub or the rubber stall guard, it's a wide metal-covered wall. A call is in to get some acupuncture to see if that will help him...


Dressage Clinic and Stevens Creek

Ralph has been pretty busy over the last few weeks; first a serious dressage clinic with the incomparable Lee Tubman, who insists that Ralph work really, really, really hard ALL THE TIME. The first couple of times Ralph was introduced to Lee's work ethic, he literally colicked after the second day - the stress of that much concentration was too much for him to manage! He is now much better, having an excellent first session and making a reasonable effort on day two as well.

We followed that up with an Event at Stevens Creek - our first appearance there - which was a lot of fun. We stayed with the hostess-with-the-mostest, Casey Gillis, the evening before, and were assisted on the day by the very capable Caitlin.



I've always found a one-day event asks a lot of a young horse, and I much prefer two-day events, but we managed a decent dressage after quite a long delay; then somehow arrived at the stadium jumping just in time to hear we were supposed to be next in the ring! Fortunately there were riders ready to go and we were able to get a short but effective warm-up in and had a very solid clear round. More delays before cross-country obviously had an effect - I almost got us eliminated by nearly jumping the wrong fence # 2; Ralph was very agile and honest when I took him off his line about three strides out and jump the correct fence at a VERY sharp angle! The rest of the course went well, although the car parked directly behind a fence I was headed to had to move pretty quickly when I got their attention and they realized they were in the way...Ralph didn't have a lot of 'get up and go' on the cross-country, and I didn't get after him as I really want him to get enthusiastic about galloping faster on his own. His former life as a polo-pony-ponier was not a lot of fun for him and when I first got him you could feel him shut down when we were cantering. Nonetheless, we had only 7 time faults and finished 6th:) In our canters around the hayfield at home he IS showing more enthusiasm, so I think he may have just switched off a bit at the event with the long delay. Onward and upward - this weekend is the Ottawa Horse Trials, probably our last run of the season.


Robinson Horse Trials
We headed down to Robinson Stables in Sutton for the August 20-21 Event and calmly settled into the stabling - until Miss Peekay arrived and all hell broke loose! Ralph was completely besotted (nevermind that he ignores her at home!) and unfortunately his silliness affected his performance in all three phases. In dressage his test felt quite nice except for the constant neck-craning to locate his beloved who was still in the warm-up area, leaving him in 11th (of 20) after dressage.

Leaving Peekay in the warmup before cross-country was even worse - he was running sideways (into the ditch), and threatening to rear (although that would have taken a LOT of effort!). He shot out of the start box, whinnying and trying to drift toward his beloved, but he did jump really well despite being very distracted between the fences for much of the course. He jumped clear but got quite a few time penalties, so stood 14th after cross.

Stadium was more of the same - trying to locate the lovely grey mare at very inopportune times - like heading past the in-gate toward the last line; his inattention caused him to stumble and get discombobulated approaching the second-last jump and he had to stop. We reorganized and he jumped it really well and we finished in 16th place. I will make sure we do our next outing or two without any familiar faces and try to re-establish his focus a bit!




Harmony Horse Trials
It was a week of ups and downs - and not just in the trot...;) On Monday, Ralph coughed several times while I rode, and had a creamy nasal discharge from one nostril. With Harmony Horse Trials coming up on the weekend and an upgrade to Pre-Training scheduled, there was no time to fool around and I called the vet. Tuesday morning Ralph was treated for a bacterial gutteral pouch infection, which involved sedation, and then having tubes stuck waaaaay up his nose and large syringes of medication injected into them to flush out the gutteral pouches. He was then turned out alone to allow torrents of goop to flow out of his head. No riding, and the weekend was also in doubt.

Wednesday we were to try some flatwork. Ralph was quite hysterical with the flies, to the point where I had to ride him in the arena to have any sort of concentration from him. He coughed and sputtered a few times, but the nasal discharge had cleared up. It was not a very encouraging session and I thought I would downgrade my entry - or cancel all together!

On Thursday things started to turn around - had a very positive and confident jumping school and we were back on the beam! At Harmony, the beginning of Ralph's dressage was not great as he was crooked, but the second half was quite satisfactory, putting him in 9th position (of 16) with 67.75%/48.4 pp. On the cross-country we seemed to find a lot of long spots and Ralph was making very big efforts, but galloped in with only 4 time penalties to move to 11th. As an aside, at this stage I do not wear a stopwatch - I go as fast as the horse is comfortable and once he is making the time and going clear I know it is usually time to move up a division.
I was thrilled with him in the stadium jumping on Sunday - he had plenty of energy and was jumping generously, but from much more reasonable distances. One of only a few clear rounds, he finished 9th with a very satisfied rider. Sometimes when things are going wrong, all you can do is just keep moving forward and things will work out:)




Tandalee Horse Trials
After missing the last three 'outings' for various reasons, we got back in gear for the Tandalee Horse Trials. Arrived on Friday afternoon and was lucky to stay on board when Ralph got a little hysterical with the bugs bothering him when we were having a hack around.
For the Dressage on Saturday he must have thought his warm-up was enough work because as soon as he got in the ring he went to sleep. The first half of the test was a combination of him tripping and me kicking, but I did get through to him and the second half was beautiful.
I was concerned about his motivation level for cross-country, but he was all over it - making the time on a hilly course and attacking the jumps with gusto.
Sunday was Stadium Jumping time, and Ralph struggled a bit with the uneven ground, stumbling twice at very inopportune times and knocking down a rail. He sometimes forgets that he is not still on a manicured polo field and has to actually pay attention to where his feet are going...Nonetheless, he finished 5th of 17 and we look forward to our next Event - Harmony Horse Trials!




Ringworm and Dressage
As I arrived to braid Ralph at 6:00 a.m. on June 26 to get ready for the AERSO dressage show at Equestran, I noticed Ralphie had a nasty, swollen bug bite on his back. Yes, directly under the saddle. I poked and prodded a bit and it didn't seem to bother him, so off we went.
His first test went well, with a score of almost 66% - 3 percentage points higher than last time. When I got on to warm up for the second test, he was bucking on the way to the warm up and actually bucked during a lengthened trot across the diagonal. "Wow!", I thought, "he thinks he's on the way to cross-country!". WRONG. Monday morning his back was a mess and I called the vet. Not a bug bite - RINGWORM:( So, we ended up with a week of an unhappy horse and missed the Jessica Phoenix clinic at Oakhurst that I was really looking forward to. The good news is it is much better and now I have learned something new. Something I would have been quite happy to not have first-hand experience with!




Eventing at the Park
Ralph got on the trailer on Saturday thinking it was an oven; when he came back on Sunday, he thought it was Noah's Ark!
A VERY wet day in Ottawa for our first Event of the season. Ralph wanted out, out, OUT of his stall...until he got out into the rain, at which time he had serious second thoughts! We did a respectable dressage in the pouring rain in water halfway up to his knees, and then thought seriously about scratching.
The rain let up and the stadium jumping ring still had amazing footing, so on we went, with Ralph jumping a nice, steady (we'll just ignore that combination line for now) clear.
Decided to give the cross-country a go, so with light rain falling we headed out again. Ralph was great - a little cautious to start, but gained confidence despite the holding footing to finish clear with a few time faults and 5th overall. I drove home in pyjamas, having been soaked through 4 pair of pants and breeches, two shirts, two fleeces, and two 'waterproof' jackets. A big thank you to Kathy Hledin for coming up to help me - a little enthusiasm on a trying day was just what we needed!




Jessica Clinic
We just finished two days of training with Jessica Phoenix up at Beaulieu. Ralph was a very good boy, having one session each of dressage, stadium work and cross country. He was more relaxed travelling and in the stable, although "wandering around and gawking at things" is still a big part of his away-from-home activity! Lots of homework to do, but we're feeling pretty pumped for the season!
An early attempt at a BIG ditch!




Oakhurst XC Derby
Off to Oakhurst in Ottawa for the XC Derby - a combination of stadium jumping and XC. Ralph was very good, especially in the second course where he was doing a little less gawking around while cantering on cross-country.
I always feel there are many more 'phases' to competing when you are trying to do it on your own: there's the 'equipment prep' phase of cleaning, organizing and packing all the tack and stable equipment needed; the 'transport phase' of making sure truck and trailer are ready, and driving there and back ; the 'groom's role' (unless I am lucky enough to have help) of bandaging, grooming, washing, braiding, walking, etc.; the 'runnning around phase' which includes trips to the secretary, course walking, and the all-important FOOD element; and finally, the actual riding and competing part.
Today went very well except for the 'transport phase' in which I locked the keys (and key pieces of equipment) in the truck almost immediately upon arrival! Fortunately, a call to CAA resolved the issue within the hour and the other phases continued without incident. Point being, there's a whole lot that goes into each successful 5-minute performance!
A new season awaits!




Aerso Dressage
Ralphie was a good boy in his debut at First Level, scoring in the low 60s. He was stunned (and not impressed) to discover he had to go out and do a second test - his limited attention span was taxed to the max doing the first one! Jenny also had an excellent first show of the season - winning both her classes. Next week we're off to practice Ralph's cross-country skills at the Upper Canada Derby at Oakhurst.


Health Checks
Ralph had his Coggins Test, blood drawn, and his vaccinations for this year done today. It was exhausting....
Ralph sees Ray Matthews, his farrier, every 5 weeks, and Chris for some physiotherapy once a month. Ralph has some TMJ issues leftover from his polo days and I like to keep on top of any other little issues before they become big ones!